home gardening

The Non-Gardeners Garden

When you move into a new house, you know to expect that there might be a few unwanted surprises. You prepare yourself for the house to be messy, for the evidence of the previous owners aborted DIY attempts – it’s all part and parcel of making your home where someone else once made theirs.

However, the above are small fry when it comes to the trickiest of changes that you might face. This problem isn’t just one that’s going to involve painting over a few dodgy walls or laying a new carpet – it requires (or at least, asks for) a total change in the way you live your life. What do you do when you find yourself with a brand new garden… and you’ve no interest in gardening?

It’s not so much of a surprise, admittedly – you will have been well aware that your new home came equipped with an outdoor space when you bought it. However, now you live there, it’s less of an abstract thought and more a reality that you have to deal with. There’s nothing pleasant about it, either. Even just leaving it for a couple of weeks while you settle in and try to get used to your new surroundings isn’t going to do much good; with alarming speed, you will see new weeds growing and new problems presenting themselves. It’s a matter you’re clearly going to have to get ahead of, and fast.

Gardening: Not Really Your Thing

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For some inexperienced gardeners, moving into a house with a ready-made garden probably sounds ideal. They can delight themselves by learning the various joys of gardening, teaching themselves how to maintain it and perhaps even discovering a delightful new hobby that will last them for the rest of their lives.

You, however, suspect that that’s not going to be quite the case for you.

It’s hard to deny it, either. While gardening is a nice idea, there’s no doubt that it’s a fairly time-consuming hobby. Just taking your eye off the ball for a week can be enough to send your garden into ruin. Then there’s the fact that there’s just so much to learn, from planting schedules to deep-knowledge stuff like companion planting. It’s not something that particularly inspires you, and there’s nothing wrong with that! One of the benefits of existing in the 21st century is that you don’t need to know this stuff if you don’t want to – and no one but you can make the decision on whether or not gardening is a hobby you wish to pursue.

If you make the decision that you don’t want to maintain a garden that requires a heavy workload, then it might be the right one for your life. It’s a decision that will give you more time to spend doing the things you actually want to do, rather than grabbing an hour every week just to mow a lawn you resent and weed flower beds you’d rather didn’t exist. If it feels like the right decision for you, then go with it.

Of course, as beneficial as such a you-positive decision is… what do you do with the garden when you’ve decided you’re not going to maintain it?

Consider Your Options

One option that isn’t really an option at all is to do nothing. If you’ve moved into a house with a well-manicured garden, then it’s going to need maintaining – you can’t just ignore that. If you leave it for too long, you risk the perils of overgrowth that soon becomes almost impossible to wade through. So you can’t just throw your hands up and abandon the whole pursuit; it will swiftly get out of control and require even more work to try and rectify it. Don’t make work for yourself in the future; make decisions about your next steps as quickly as you can.

So what are the options that might actually work?

Green-Free Garden

If you don’t want to have to maintain a garden, then the most simple solution is to… not to. Aim for a green-free garden; i.e. an outdoor space that is where a “garden” would normally be, but without anything that makes it recognizably a garden. Basically, a garden without plants or a lawn that you have to attend to on a regular basis.

There are a variety of ways in which you can transform your outdoor space into a green-free zone. Most require some form of construction work, but at least it will resolve the problem once and for all.

An Extra Room

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If you don’t want to use your outdoor space for anything conventionally garden-like, then transform it into an extra room. Log cabins, for example, make for great permanent structures that can function as an extra living room. All you need is to wire an electrical supply out there – which is definitely a job for a professional – and suddenly you have an additional, year-round function room. If you don’t want to use it as a living space, then it can become a storage area that helps keep the rest of the house clutter-free.

Entertainment Areas

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If you like being outside but aren’t quite so keen on the gardening aspect, then the simplest option is to create entertainment spaces. For example, companies like Stylemaster Patios will be able to discuss with you the options that you might want to consider for a patio that can host a barbecue and a seating area. This means you still get the use of your outdoor space, but without the need for constant maintenance.

Another option is to build a deck, which you can even do for yourself if you know your way around power tools and don’t mind a project. As with patios, decks don’t just serve the purpose of getting rid of your greenery – they also look fantastic in their own right.

Swimming Pool

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Finally, why not think big and go for a swimming pool? Such an addition would require the removal of all of that time-consuming greenery, as well as give you a luxury item in a space that would once have been a chore. If you have the budget, then this is definitely an idea that’s well worth lingering over.

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